Archive for February, 2009

Give Life

February 25, 2009

I recently heard Russell Osguthorpe speak where he emphasized one of the ten commandments from the Bible, “Thou shalt not kill.” Most of us don’t really have a problem with this particular directive, but what if you were to push it to the opposite end of that spectrum – “Give life!” Our interactions with others are rarely neutral, either we are killing them a little (through harsh words, anger, or criticism) or we are giving them life (through cheerfulness, validation, and praise). Let’s all take that biblical exhortation a little more seriously by giving life!

Life is not about waiting for the storms to pass…
It’s about learning how to dance in the rain.
 – Unknown

P.S. This is the last few days for the February promotional “decimal discount” for Facing Your Giants – CLICK HERE to purchase this coaching package for a phenomenal price!

I Love You Too Much To Argue

February 18, 2009

Conflicts are a natural part of life.  The very thing that makes us interesting to each other (our differences) also creates the opportunity for conflict because of differing opinions, values, views, or preferences.  This is also true between parents and children, especially as kids begin to assert their independence.  Jim Fay, author of Parenting With Love and Logic, shared with our Parental Power group yesterday that there are some things you control and some things you don’t.  There is no value in arguing with your kids.  When they try to draw you into an argument, simply respond with “I love you too much to argue” and then figure out what you control and what you don’t.  If you have kids, you would really appreciate this interview – http://www.parental-power.com/2009/02/17/parental-power-with-love-and-logic/

 

Three grand essentials to happiness in this life

Are something to do, something to love,

And something to hope for..

       Joseph Addison

 

P.S.  If you live in or around Utah County, I want to see you at our “A More Perfect Union” date night for couples on Saturday! – http://amoreperfectunion2.eventbrite.com

Answer the What-Ifs

February 11, 2009

One of the favorite questions of your subconscious mind is “what if…?”  This question can be a powerful force for positive or negative results in your life.  When your mind asks this question about something you fear like, “what if I lose my job?”, or “what if I run out of money?”, or “what if my loved one dies?”, there is a predictable response.  The subconscious cannot tolerate a non-answer, so it makes one up – usually “well I couldn’t handle that!”  This triggers your fight-or-flight response, and you will experience fear, anxiety, and avoidance.  To move beyond this paralysis, you have to intentionally and consciously answer the “what if” questions.  OK then, what WOULD you do if you lost your job, or ran out of money, or lost a loved one?  You will feel yourself avoiding this line of thinking, but push through and answer the “what if?”.  You will find that you COULD actually handle it – not that you want to, but you could handle it.  This frees up  your mind for more productive thinking and helps you to move past the barriers.  Answer the “what if?”!

 

Do the thing you fear,

And the death of fear is certain.

       Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

Having Fun On Purpose

February 4, 2009

Bertrand Russell once said, “The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.”  I believe that if you are not having fun, you’re probably doing it wrong.  In the fast pace that we often set for ourselves, remember to enjoy some of life’s simple pleasures.  Gaze at the moon, smell the flowers, pet a dog, watch a toddler explore, listen to a waterfall – fill up your soul.  In less than a minute you could close your eyes, take a slow deep breath, and then open your eyes and intentionally focus on something you are grateful for in your immediate surroundings.  Take a few minutes today to notice just how good things are, then keep moving forward.

 

In all of living have much fun and laughter. 

Life is to be enjoyed, not just endured.

       Gordon B. Hinckley